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tulum-treehouse-makers-001.jpg

The Makers


The Makers

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The Makers


The Makers

 

Tulum Treehouse is the collective effort of a diverse group of local artisans, builders, craftspeople and international designers. Our makers come from very different backgrounds but are united in their commitment to using local, organic, sustainable materials whenever possible toward the creation of a uniquely beautiful and welcoming collaborative space.

 

 

Co-Lab Design Office

Architecture
 

 
 

Co-Lab Design Office is a full-service architecture studio located in Tulum. Inspired by the natural beauty of the Yucatan, the group’s projects encourage a greater appreciation of and connection to the natural world through design. Embracing sustainable principles, each project carefully weaves the architectural program with the beauty of each site to create unique contextual designs. Locally sourced natural materials and handcrafted finishes render rooms built around views of nature, gentle breezes, light and shadows, to create new compositions and relationships.

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Annabell Kutucu

Interior Design & Styling

 

 
 

A renowned interior designer based in Berlin, Annabell Kutucu has raised great interest with her work on private residences and various international hospitality projects like San Giorgio Mykonos and Scorpios Mykonos, a contemporary interpretation of the ancient Greek agora. Her work combines the handmade, the artisanal, and the organic—elements such as old linen, rough textiles, and weathered wood—with vintage and contemporary pieces to create effortlessly holistic spaces in perfect communion with their surroundings.

 

Jorge & Rita

Carpentry

 
 

Jorge and Rita are a local family of carpenters that collects fallen, displaced, and diseased trees to turn into unique furniture pieces such as tables, chairs, decoration accessories, and sculptures. They are based in the Yucatan Peninsula, but they collect their wood mostly from the tropical region of Veracruz, where flood waters deposit large reserves of wood along the rivers and streams. Jorge collaborates with a variety of local welders, who craft the steel parts of his furniture pieces.

 

 

Caravana

Textiles

 

 
 

Caravana is a textile brand by the Mexico-based Italian design duo Francesca Bonato and Jacopo Janniello Ravagnan, who also founded the award-winning luxury womenswear label Hacienda Montaecristo. The company aims to preserve handiwork traditions and honor the legacy of authentic craftsmanship from around the world, while drawing on Mayan and nature’s influences. “Caravana believes its artisans, thread makers, fabric knitters, and seamstresses are family,” said Ravagnan. “The Caravana community works harmoniously to give each piece a life, a story, a soul.”

 

 

La Chicharra

Ceramics
 

 
 

La Chicharra is a local Oaxacan ceramic maker that melds traditional artisanal techniques with advanced technology to produce beautiful high-quality tableware in the native textures and colors of Oaxaca. The company’s non-toxic, lead-free ceramic tableware is made in collaboration with various local designers, such as Valeria Tamayo, who designed the Basic Crockery line, and Justina Ricárdez, whose Xocolatl series won second place at the Franz Mayer Museum’s Seventh Biennial of Utilitarian Ceramics in Mexico City.

 

 

Lolita Lolita

Amenities
 

 
 

Lolita Lolita is a Tulum-based, all-natural amenities line specializing in organic skin care, body oils, hair care, and other aromatic products such as candles and love potions. Looking to the region’s health rituals and lush biodiversity and inspired by recipes handed down from grandmother to mother to daughter, Lolita Lolita relies on indigenous natural ingredients like aloe vera, chile, peppermint, rosemary, and honey to create unique tonics devoted to robust health of body, mind, and spirit.

 

 

Rosalinda

Basket weaving
 

 
 

Rosalinda has dedicated 30 years to the art of weaving. Mayans used bejuco, a local fiber, to weave baskets for coffee collection, and later developed a diversity of functional and decorative objects to be used for domestic activities. Beyond the fine technique of weaving, bejuco artisans remove mature vines from the forest at the new moon and transport them wrapped in rolls to dry in the sun. After removing the bark or peel, they extract and moisten the internal fiber to use as raw material.